Tax Attorney–Role in Tax Settlement, Relief, Etc.

A Tax Settlement is a way to settle your back tax liabilities with the IRS. It is a legal agreement where you agree to pay a fixed amount to the IRS over a period of five years. In return, the IRS forgives your liability. If you meet all the terms of your offer, you will receive a reduced tax bill. To qualify for a Tax Division Settlement, you must have a large balance due. The IRS will not agree to any less than the balance you owe.

A Tax Settlement reduces your outstanding debt to an amount that is more manageable. In addition, interest fees will stop increasing. You will be able to make low scheduled payments and eliminate late fees. The IRS considers a Tax Settlement to be a legal agreement that you have to comply with. You will be able to make flexible payments that are convenient for you. A Tax Relief will allow you to get the best refund possible and avoid paying penalties.

A Tax Settlement is a legally binding contract. The amount owed will be reduced to a reasonable level. The IRS will no longer charge you interest. As long as you follow up with the IRS as agreed to, you will not have to worry about late fees. Further, your payment plan will be more flexible. As a result, you will be able to pay your debt on time. By requesting a Tax Settlement, you can avoid costly and stressful collection efforts.

While paying taxes is an obligation in the United States, many taxpayers are unable to pay their back taxes. As with any business, the IRS cannot collect the money from a person who cannot pay. In a Tax Settlement, a taxpayer agrees to pay back their tax debt on a schedule that works for him. The IRS will agree to a specific interest rate and the terms of the repayment plan. The IRS will not accept a Tax Settlement if you are unable to meet these conditions.

Unless you have a high-dollar case, the IRS is not required to pay the full amount owed. The IRS will often abate the unpaid balances. But you should be aware that your settlement may result in a lower tax bill. You should seek legal advice from a tax attorney and take the time to review your options. If you don’t qualify for a Tax Settlement, you will still be eligible for penalty abatement, which will allow you to pay your taxes and avoid penalties.

Before pursuing a Tax Settlement, you should consult with your attorney. A qualified attorney can assist you with this process, said Oregon’s best tax attorney. In addition to advising you on the best course of action, he can help you find the best possible settlement option for your tax situation. If you hire a skilled lawyer, you can rest assured that the IRS will not be able to take advantage of your tax problem. You will also benefit from the extensive experience and knowledge of the IRS.